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Tuesday, February 15, 2011

God loves entertainment!

Was just sent this article from a buddy...

God at the Grammys: The Chosen Ones
Why do so many musical superstars think that their careers are part of a divine plan?


One night last summer, Lady Gaga sat in a tour bus in England, covered in stage blood from her concert that day. She told me that she had cried hysterically before a recent show because she'd had a dream that the devil was trying to take her. She then said, in earnest, that the spirit of her dead aunt was literally inside her body and that she had eaten a bovine heart to face her fear of her father's heart surgery.

If a stranger on a train had said all of this to me, I would have moved a few seats away. But this was one of the most famous women in the world. "It's hard to just chalk it all up to myself," Lady Gaga said of her success, explaining that there was "a higher power that's been watching out for me."

Cut to…Snoop Dogg in the living room of his home outside Los Angeles, smoking a blunt and discussing his comeback after leaving Death Row Records. "God makes everything happen," he said. "He put me in that situation with Death Row, and he took me out of it."

Cut to…a hotel room where Christina Aguilera is gorging on junk food and discussing her success. "All of this isn't something that I did," she told me. "It's something that is totally there for a purpose." In a separate interview, Ms. Aguilera's mother explained that fame was her daughter's destiny: "We thought there must be some divine intervention. Early on, I realized…God has plans for her."

When this year's Grammy winners accept their awards on Sunday night, God is likely to be thanked and praised more than a few times. It's a longstanding showbiz tradition, after all, prevalent at the Oscars, the Emmys and even the AVN Awards for adult movies. Until I began interviewing many of the winners of these awards two decades ago, I thought this was a sign of humility and gratitude (or at least an affectation of them). But the truth is more interesting than that. (WSJ)

Which reminded me of this article I read last year:

When did God become a sports fan?

In addition to musical fame, apparently god likes to give douches (the people, not the shower) superior athletic abilities too.

Rich Franklin cornered the man who challenged him and launched a looping kick that caught him on his jaw.

The man's face flushed red, and his knees wobbled. Franklin moved in, pounding his opponent with haymakers until he collapsed, grimacing.

Franklin, an Ultimate Fighting Championship middleweight, had just scored another victory. The chiseled fighter took the ringside microphone and faced the roaring crowd.

"I want to say thanks to God, all praise to him," he said. Then he bowed and folded his hands in prayer as his groggy opponent was led outside the ring.

Was it Franklin's right hand or was it the hand of God that helped him smite his opponent? Ringside viewers may disagree, but God seems to be standing in the corner of a lot of victorious athletes these days.

Baseball players point to the heavens after hitting home runs; NFL players pray in the end zone after scoring. Competitors routinely thank Jesus, along with their sponsors, in post-game interviews.

Thanking God from the winner's circle has become so common that one British newspaper published a letter to the editor entitled: "Leave me out of your petty games --Love, God."

The British letter raised a question: Does God care who wins on game day? And, if so, do losers somehow have less faith?

Praising God or selling one's goodness?

Franklin, the UFC fighter, says he doesn't know if God cared if he knocked out Travis "The Serial Killer" Lutter in Montreal, Canada. But "it doesn't hurt to ask."

"Win or lose, I always thank God for what he's given me," says Franklin, an evangelical Christian.

Franklin says he thanks God after victories because he has felt God's presence in the midst of mixed martial arts battle.

"There are times when I've been in fights and I felt like I was about to lose and all of a sudden things turned around on me," he says. "My opponent lost his position. I wiggled my way out of a submission. I felt like there was a hand in it."

Yet some sports commentators say assuming God is a sports fan trivializes faith.

Athletes who publicly thank God for victory are often calling more attention to themselves than their faith, says William J. Baker, author of "Playing with God."

They are selling their goodness, and their brand of faith, to a captive audience, says Baker, who describes himself as a Christian.

"I don't think it's the right place and it's not the right gesture," says Baker, a former high school quarterback. "It's an athlete using a moment to sell a product, like soap." (CNN)

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